Due to the reduced staffing numbers our opening hours have changed and we are open MONDAY to FRIDAY 8am to 5pm and SATURDAYS 10am to 1pm. We continue to provide 24/7 emergency care as well as some essential care. Please be aware it may take us longer than usual to respond to queries that you send us.

Please DO NOT turn up at the practice unannounced, you MUST phone first and DO NOT COME TO THE SURGERY IF YOU ARE DEMONSTRATING CLINICAL SIGNS OF COVID-19!

Further advice can be found here. We thank you for your patience.

As vets and pet owners, one of the most important things we can do for our rabbits is to make sure they are protected against infectious disease by vaccinating them. At their annual health check appointment, your vet will carry out a full physical health check and let you know what vaccinations they recommend your pet receives.

WHAT VACCINATIONS SHOULD MY PET RECEIVE?

Pet rabbits in the UK require vaccination to protect them from myxomatosis, and both strains of viral haemorrhagic disease – VHD 1 and VHD 2.

DOES MY RABBIT REALLY NEED TO BE VACCINATED? THEY DON’T EVER LEAVE THE GARDEN.

Pet rabbits are actually even more vulnerable to infectious disease than dogs or cats. After all, there are almost no stray or feral dogs roaming the streets in the UK, and very few wild or feral cats. But there is a large population of wild rabbits that are genetically the same as our pet bunnies. In addition to this, deadly infectious diseases were deliberately introduced into this wild population in past attempts to control numbers. Myxomatosis and viral haemorrhagic disease remain common, and in some cases are even increasing in frequency. Fleas carry myxomatosis, and VHD can even be carried short distances by wind, so direct contact with wild rabbits isn’t needed for infection to be transmitted. While cases of disease such as distemper in dogs or panleukopaenia in cats are luckily rare now due to excellent uptake of vaccination, we still regularly see pet rabbits with myxomatosis or VHD, and very few survive. Protecting rabbits is just as important as protecting dogs and cats

WHEN SHOULD MY PET BE VACCINATED?

Myxomatosis vaccination can be given from 5 weeks of age, and VHD vaccination from 10 weeks of age. We recommend that your rabbit is protected as soon as possible after you get them.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD MY PET BE VACCINATED?

Rabbits should be revaccinated every year for myxomatosis and VHD.

WILL MY PET BE UNWELL AFTER VACCINATION?

Vaccination stimulates the immune system, which can trigger a mild fever. This is most commonly seen after initial vaccinations, though it is sometimes seen after re-vaccination.

Your pet might be a little sleepy after their appointment: don’t be alarmed if this is the case. In most cases, pets feel and behave absolutely normally.

An allergic or adverse response to a vaccination is possible, as with any medication, but very rare. Signs of an allergic reaction may include swelling around the nose or mouth, or occasionally diarrhoea. If you have any concerns that your pet seems unwell after a vaccination, please contact the surgery for advice.

Pets can a go about their normal routine in the run up to their vaccination appointment and after it. There is no need to withhold food before or after, or restrict exercise or activity.